Living With Dinosaurs: Prehistoric Animals That Are Still Alive Today

Unless someone invents time travel, we will never see a real-life woolly mammoth, saber-tooth tiger, or dinosaur. Those animals went extinct millions of years ago. However, plenty of prehistoric animals still walk among us today, if you know where to look.

These animals have remained relatively unchanged for millions of years, and some even outlasted the dinosaurs. Some are so rare that scientists thought they were extinct until 1938; others were discovered within the past couple of years. Here are the world’s living animal fossils.

Komodo Dragons

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KOMODO ISLAND, INDONESIA – DECEMBER 2014: Two Komodo dragons fight, taken on Komodo Island, Indonesia, December 2014. IN a battle of claws and strength, two male Komodo dragons fight for dominance. At almost 10 feet in length and weighing up to 70kg, the Komodo dragon is one of Earths most feared animals. The worlds largest lizard has been living in the harsh climates of Indonesias Sunda Islands for millions of years, dominating the land and eating anything they can catch. With sharp claws and powerful legs, the Komodo dragon also has the secret weapon of toxic saliva. Containing approximately 50 strains of bacteria, a deadly bite from the dragon will kill its prey within 24 hours. PHOTOGRAPH BY Yulia Sudukova / Barcroft Images London-T:+44 207 033 1031 E:hello@barcroftmedia.com – New York-T:+1 212 796 2458 E:hello@barcroftusa.com – New Delhi-T:+91 11 4053 2429 E:hello@barcroftindia.com www.barcroftmedia.com (Photo credit should read Yulia Sundukova / Barcroft Image / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)
KOMODO ISLAND, INDONESIA – DECEMBER 2014: Two Komodo dragons fight, taken on Komodo Island, Indonesia, December 2014. IN a battle of claws and strength, two male Komodo dragons fight for dominance. At almost 10 feet in length and weighing up to 70kg, the Komodo dragon is one of Earths most feared animals. The worlds largest lizard has been living in the harsh climates of Indonesias Sunda Islands for millions of years, dominating the land and eating anything they can catch. With sharp claws and powerful legs, the Komodo dragon also has the secret weapon of toxic saliva. Containing approximately 50 strains of bacteria, a deadly bite from the dragon will kill its prey within 24 hours. PHOTOGRAPH BY Yulia Sudukova / Barcroft Images London-T:+44 207 033 1031 E:hello@barcroftmedia.com – New York-T:+1 212 796 2458 E:hello@barcroftusa.com – New Delhi-T:+91 11 4053 2429 E:hello@barcroftindia.com www.barcroftmedia.com (Photo credit should read Yulia Sundukova / Barcroft Image / Barcroft Media via Getty Images)

Komodo dragons are the largest lizard species on earth and the closest reptile we have to a dinosaur. However, researchers believe that they didn’t originate in Indonesia since they found fossils of the dragon in Australia. The fossils’ dates range from 300,000 years ago to four million years ago.

Paleontologists from the Queensland Museum pinpointed fossils of a more gigantic lizard that could be the ancestor of the eight-foot-long lizard. But despite the komodo dragon’s long history, there is a lot that we don’t know about it.