Disastrous Military Blunders

The Battle Of Agincourt Did Not Turn Out How The French Had Planned

Photo Credit: Leemage/Corbis via Getty Images
Photo Credit: Leemage/Corbis via Getty Images

In 1415, King Henry V, with an English army of around 8,000, was marching in northern France when they were confronted by a much larger French army of around 30,000. The English army was fatigued, sick, and hungry. All the French had to do was block off the English from moving forward. However, the Englishmen taunted them to the point that the French performed a full-on charge.

The English longbows were far superior to those of the French, and the battlefield was wet and muddy. As the French attacked and became stuck and disorganized in the mud, they became fodder for the English archers. The English crushed the French and won the battle. In total, around 6,000 French soldiers were lost while the English only lost around 400 men.