The 20 Most Fashionable Moments Of The 60’s

Pixie Cut

The signature 1960s pixie cut was a revolution of female freedom from the minute that Audrey Hepburn chopped her locks off for film Roman Holiday. The 1920s-inspired style had the unfamiliar boyish look that graced the covers of magazines and movie screens. The style was infectious and swept the hippie era like a chic disease.

Pixie Cut

Huge names like Farrow and Twiggy were the next to adopt the charming cut and even blonde favorite Goldie Hawn jumped on the pixie train. The 60s was not the only era that the romanticized feel of the short ‘do, though. Celebrities today like Anne Hathaway, Charlize Theron, Emma Watson and Kristen Stewart have embraced the classy look of the pixie and rock it just like the beautiful, old Hollywood stars did.

The Graveyard Look

Creased at the lid, the dramatic graveyard look became the signature eye makeup look of the swinging sixties. Huge lashes with thick, black liner glorified and illuminated the feminism progression of the chic time. The 60s was the first time period where women could freely express themselves and their sensuality through fashion and personalized style, as opposed to the stiffer, more socially acceptable fashion seen in the 50s and before.

The Graveyard Look

Just as much as there was a significant emphasis on the lid crease, women really focused on the lower lashes to add that extra, psychedelic pop. As the 50s owned the classy cat-eye look, the time of free love focused more on fake lashes and high-shadowed lids that highlighted the vibrant life and colors of the 60s so effortlessly.

Aston Martin DB5

Released in 1963, the Aston Martin DB5 was a brilliant metamorphosis of magnesium that eventually became known as James Bond’s signature Goldfinger vehicle. When British inventor David Brown and Italian designer Carrozzeria Touring Superleggera implemented the DB5 from the DB Series V, they took to under the hood for all improvements.

Aston Martin DB5

Giving the gorgeous vehicle an all-aluminum engine with five-speed transmission and three SU carburettors, the DB5 was able to reach 145mph. The two-door, leather-encompassed, magnesium-alloy mechanism featured wool pile carpets, electric windows, twin fuel tanks, chrome wire wheels and even came equipped with a fire extinguisher. Just to give you a better idea of how rare this car is, in 2010 a used Aston Martin DB5 sold for $450,000!

Tie Dye

Although the history of tie dye can be traced back to 500 AD in pre-Columbian Peruvian customs, the 60s has been famously associated with the hippie-infested style of tie dye. Both Asia and Africa have recognized the process in trade since as early as 8th century, but the first American establishment of the tie dye technique was actually back in 1909 when Columbia professor Charles E. Pellow brought samples back to his class to lecture upon.

Tie Dye

As for the rebirth of the print in the 60s, it was no secret that the trippy and psychedelic colors were enhanced with the use of drugs like LSD, mushrooms, heroin, cocaine and marijuana. With the simple belief of material-free living that the hippies exuded, the physical process of creating tie dye became revolutionary and very “anti-man.”

Woodstock

With what started as a Music and Art Festival in 1969, ended in a revolution of transcendental harmony that will forever be known as the greatest event in Rock and Roll history. Divinely celestial music, mud, free love, peace, sex and drugs, the affair was free of all judgement, hate and prejudices that were lingering around the time of 60s.

Woodstock

Over 400,000 people packed themselves into an open space in Bethel, NY for three days filled with sonic genius, “pharmaceutical” relief and sleepless nights. Names like Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Joe Cocker, Santana, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Jefferson Airplane, The Who and more serenaded the almost immeasurable crowd at all hours of the day and night until its dreaded but inevitable end.

Rock N’ Roll

Lyrics that spoke to the horrors of war, the presence of selflessness found in peace, and crazy ideals instilled from a life experimenting with hallucinogens swept the country like a wave of sonic heat. If there had to be one part of the 60s that was the ultimate expression of its revolutionary understanding and influential empowerment, it was the gift of Rock and Roll. With the start of the 60s came the beginning of what we now call Classic Rock and what will always go down in history as the greatest time period for music.

Rock N’ Roll

Transcendental voices like Robert Plant, Janis Joplin, Tina Turner and Stevie Nicks were found in crappy dive bars, garage bands, and along the road have come to be some of the rarest findings in the history of music. Influenced by the indescribable power of drugs and pure interest in a loving world, Rock and Roll is one of the greatest puzzle pieces in human history.

Berets

As an original symbol of military power, berets were first adopted by the elite mountain infantry of the French army, the Chasseurs Alpins. Soon after, thousands of different military troops utilized the assumed power of the black beret but the world of fashion also paid attention. As early as the 1900s, berets were assumed as a fashion statement in Paris in both male and female senses which then bled into the popular 60s fascination with new wave French film.

Berets

Atop the heads of famous actresses like Brigitte Bardot and Catherine Deneuve, women everywhere wanted the feel of the felt caps on their heads. But, just as much as the fashion world readopted the statement in the 60s, radicals and revolutionary leaders like Fidel Castro and Che Guevara, and even the Black Panthers, were owning the original authoritative and political symbolism of the beret to implement change into the world.

Afros

Coming from the term “Afro-American,” clearly afros were an African hairstyle but in the sixties, afros saw no color. To fit along perfectly with the hippie times of low-maintenance grooming, afros were hugely popular around this time. As a symbolic representation of African pride, the afro was often sported by the “black is beautiful” movement.

Afros

However, for the free-thinking, free-loving individuals that immersed themselves in the ideals behind a hippie life, it was not uncommon for the fashionable hairstyle to be adopted by white people as well. The best part was that both female and males adopted this convenient and natural hairstyle!

Go-Go Boots

Accenting the gradual, upward evolution of skirt and dress hem lines, the length in boots also moved upward in the form of go-go boots. As a major fashion statement of the swinging sixties, go-go boots were originally identified when French designer André Courrèges created them in 1964.

Go-Go Boots

Originally termed “go-go” from the popular French expression a gogo meaning “in abundance, galore,” the trendy fad brought happiness just as promised. These low-heeled, mid-calf, white leather boots swept the 60s era like a fashionable fever when Nancy Sinatra’s “These Boots Are Made For Walkin” was released in 1966 and initiated a revolution of female empowerment and a positive sense of sensuality.

Miniskirts/ Dresses

It wasn’t until 1966 that miniskirts and dresses were accepted globally, after designer Mary Quant found herself inspired by the length of go-go boots. She decided to take the hem of skirts and dresses up six to seven inches to enhance the complementary difference with the go-go boots for her boutique bazaar, which eventually led to the coined term “the Chelsea look.”

Miniskirts/ Dresses

Unlike what is often portrayed in photos from the sixties, skirts and dresses were of appropriate length for most of the era. Stemming from the “sack dress” that debuted in 1957, the miniskirt became what it still is today.

Bell-Bottom Jeans

The fashionable “flare” of the 60s was the bell-bottom obsession that we still enjoy today. Originally derived from the U.S. Navy’s bell-shaped trousers, the chic trend subtly accentuated curves when accented with go-go boots, clogs, or Cuban-heeled shoes by ’67.

Bell-Bottom Jeans

Usually found in denim, but also in bright cotton and satin polyester, the widened pant legs were favored by both female and male audiences and were even further popularized by Sonny and Cher in the 70s. Just like the mini-skirt, the fad of bell-bottoms did not catch on until the mid-to-late 60s/ early 70s but it still considered a significant fashionable trend of the hippie movement to this day.

Fringe

Playing into the typical hippie fashion sense, fringe was a big part of the epic “free-flowing” and effortless theme during the 60s. Often the fringe could be found made of tie dye and leather and would drape sun-kissed mid-drifts in company with bell-bottoms and high boots or even go-go boots.

Fringe

Although fringe was first introduced by Native Americans, the 1920’s iconic flapper look adopted the frayed pattern with class in different materials like silk, cotton, beads and rayon. Just as berets found their way back into the 60s, so did fringe — although it was used in a less formal sense.

Bouffant Hair

Bigger was better in the sixties and hair was no exception. Bouffant hair, stemmed from the French term ‘bouffer’ meaning to puff out, was hugely popular during the time period, matching the dramatic makeup, skimpy outfits and big boots.

Bouffant Hair

The very first to be recognized as the bouffant queen of 60s was none other than First Lady Jackie Kennedy who made the French-style poof wildly popular. Even though the hairstyle looked simple to execute, the proper teasing of the top-of-the-head hair was vital to the long-term maintenance of the do, as well as hair spray!

Tights

You wouldn’t think something as simple as tights could be so revolutionary, but tights, also referred to as pantyhose, were easily one of the biggest trends of the 60s. Following years and years of traditional, appropriate stockings, vibrantly colored tights exposed themselves under the widely popular trend of miniskirts and dresses.

Tights

Ironically, tights were originally utilized by men in Europe during Renaissance times as high and almost royal fashion and eventually found their way into the ballet industry. After barely grieving the death of the stockings that were reintroduced in the 90s, the revolution of tights was embraced by a way to feel comfortable and fashionable in the newly-created miniskirt and dress.

Pant Suits

Never before had women assumed such a masculine fashion before female pant suits were introduced in the sixties. It was so scandalous that women were forbade to wear such confused clothing in the workplace, by men who felt it was an insulting and offensive way of portraying their fashion sense.

Pant Suits

Similar to the male approach to the pant suit, these were tailored and tucked and provided the dexterity and freedom the feminine gender had often missed with tight mini skirts and dresses. This revolutionary fad is still often used today, in both the workplace and on the runway; women’s pant suits easily rank among the highest fashion in the industry when done correctly.

Flats

Evolving from the elevated height of the high heel, flats became a huge commodity throughout the era. Providing comfort, color and wiggle room, flats in general were cheap, fun and flirty and women loved them. With the introduction of PVC, or vinyl, into the industry, flats were easily affordable and easy to accessorize with.

Flats

To go along with the “free flowing ease” of the sixties, flat shoes like the Mary Janes, monk straps, saddle shoes, oxfords and pointed toe flats were wildly popular and sparked a completely different and comfortable outlook on life for women everywhere. As flats are still considerably utilized even to this day, the invention was almost transformative to the female gender.

Floppy Hats

Just like most fads of the 60s, the floppy hat has returned in recent years with a bigger-than-ever splash of hippie-ish vibes that we will always love. Considering the bouffant, guiche curls and other high-maintenance hairstyles took so long to create, the floppy hat was the perfect solution for the hippie movement.

Floppy Hats

It was functional, cute, classy and still required less upkeep than most of the hair fads we saw around this time. The original start of the floppy hat dates all the way back to the 1800s with more of a straw Little Bo Peep, sunhat feel, rather than the felt and burlap impressions of the sixties.

Guiche Curls

Before the time of blow dryers, rollers were the thing. Coke can-sized rollers graced the tops of womens’ heads overnight so they could wake up to a professional curl for both long and short hair. Curls have always been considered one of the most feminine hairstyles possible; maybe it’s because of the obvious effort it takes to establish them perfectly.

Guiche Curls

Toward the early 60s curls were still all the rage from the 50s era, especially with personalities like Jackie Kennedy wearing her signature flip-out curls that really caught on during this time. There were even different kinds of curls like the party curl, the piquant pixie, the flip out, ruffled curls and of course, big chunky curls for the hippier, chic-er chicks.

Porsche 911

The beautiful, sporty Porsche 911 model made its big debut the same year as the DB5 with a similar two-door construct. Modified to be a racing vehicle, the Porsche 911 has a rear-mounted six cylinder box engine and independent suspension.

Porsche 911

Although it has been adjusted over time, little has changed about the archetype as it remains one of the most successful competition cars in history. Only about 150,000 of the particular 60s model can be found on the road today and it still holds its reputation as one of the oldest sports coupe name plates that is still in production.

Baby Doll Dress

Although we have gone through most of the fashion history of the 60s era, we could not forget the signature baby doll dress! This fashionable piece derived from the sack dress that was popular in the 50s and really made a statement in the sixties with bright colors, especially when paired with bright tights or go-go boots.

Baby Doll Dress

Featuring an empire waist and skirt that fell just above the knee, it was meant to do exactly what it was called: make us look like baby dolls. Actresses and models of the era were often seeing rocking the frock with Mary Janes or saddle shoes, and of course with painted faces using the popular graveyard makeup look. It wouldn’t have been the 60s without it!