The First 100 Days In Office: The Best And Worst From U.S. Presidents

On July 24, 1933, the term “first 100 days” was coined by Franklin D. Roosevelt in a radio address. While he was originally talking about a 100-day session of the 73rd United States Congress, the term somehow became a way to properly measure how successful a president will be in their first term based on priorities tackled in their first 100 days. Some Presidents have managed to earn the nation’s trust and respect with the passing of some monumental laws. Others have earned some major disappointment from the public for their actions. We take a look at how some Presidents handled their first 100 days in the White House.

George Washington and the First Secretary of State

George Washington and the First Secretary of State

During his first 100 days a president, George Washington reinstated the Department of Foreign Affairs headed by a Secretary of Foreign Affairs. John Jay was the acting secretary until Thomas Jefferson came back from France. Washington would rename the position as Secretary of State and the department as the Department of State.