There’s No Place Like A New Home After The Pandemic Is Over

The news website Axios reported on a Harris Poll survey indicating that one-third of Americans are thinking about moving. And they’re not just moving for the experience of living in a new place. Most people are thinking about packing up and shipping on out because of the coronavirus.

The survey concluded that people want to move to less populated areas with jobs allowing the option to work from home. And it doesn’t hurt if the city is also more likely to recover economically from the virus’ impact. If you’re looking for a change of scenery after the pandemic, keep scrolling; you might just find a new place to call home!

Green Bay, Wisconsin

Green Bay, Wisconsin
Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images
Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

We are calling all football fans out there! If you need a change of scenery, a new team to cheer for, and are interested in what it’s like to live in the snow, then you’re going to want to look into Green Bay, Wisconsin.

Not only is it a fun sports town, but it is very affordable to live, too. Around 75.5 percent of households in the city use less than 30 percent of their income to pay for housing, with the average housing cost around $916 a month.

Omaha, Nebraska

Omaha, Nebraska
Jean-Erick PASQUIER/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images
Jean-Erick PASQUIER/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

Omaha, Nebraska, is located on the Missouri River and has a lot to offer anyone thinking about moving there. If you love the outdoors, then there’s the Lewis & Clark National Historic Trail to explore, or there’s the Henry Doorly Zoo and Aquarium. The complex focuses on conservation work.

But that’s not the best part of the city. Omaha is incredibly affordable. The cost of living is about seven percent lower than the national average, and the unemployment rate was only around 2 percent pre-virus. So, Omaha is most likely going to be one of the lucky cities to make a nice economic recovery.

State College, Pennsylvania

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Ned Dishman/Getty Images
Ned Dishman/Getty Images

If you’re looking for some sports and fun after the virus, then maybe think about relocating to State College, Pennsylvania. The town is home to Penn State’s main campus, and with Beaver Stadium there, you’re sure to go to more than one football game.

And while housing isn’t the cheapest, employment rates are fairly good for anyone with a Bachelor’s degree or higher. So, if you’re in the market for some sports, a job, and an overall fun time, think about State College. It’s pretty much the college experience, minus the studying and being broke.

Columbus, Indiana

Columbus, Indiana
Carol M. Highsmith/Buyenlarge/Getty Images
Carol M. Highsmith/Buyenlarge/Getty Images

With a population of 44,061, according to the 2010 census, Columbus, Indiana, is a fairly tiny city. But it has a whole lot of style! The city is known for its unique architecture and local art. And, in 2005, GQ named Columbus one of the “62 Reasons to Love Your Country.”

Today, the city is one of the most affordable in the country, with almost 80 percent of households using less than 30 percent of their income for housing. The employment rate in the city is also very low, less than three percent per-virus.

Iowa City, Iowa

Iowa City, Iowa
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

For anyone looking for a small-town feel in a city, look no further than Iowa City, Iowa. As of 2018, the population of the city is a low 76,290. Not too bad for a city! But despite the low city population, there is a lot to do, including strolling along the Iowa River.

Not only is it a great place to relocate, but the unemployment rate pre-virus was a very low two point two percent, a number that is tied as the sixth-lowest rate in metropolitan areas. If you have a degree, you should be in pretty good shape finding a job in Iowa City.

Grand Island, Nebraska

Grand Island, Nebraska
Dominic Chavez/The Boston Globe via Getty Images
Dominic Chavez/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

As of the 2010 census, Grand Island, Nebraska, has a population of 48,520 people. When it comes to city population, it doesn’t get much lower than that! But the scarce city population isn’t even the best part. For people looking to move, this city is also a very cheap option.

Compared to other metropolitan areas throughout the country, Grand Island has very affordable housing. Almost 80 percent of the city’s population uses less than 30 percent of their income on housing. Compared to the rest of the nation, Grand Island’s cost of living is 15.7 percent lower than the national average.

Lansing, Michigan

Lansing, Michigan
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

Home to Michigan State, Lansing, Michigan, is said to be one of the cities to move to after the pandemic. Not only is it a college town with a fun downtown area, but it’s also a cultural hub with the R.E. Olds Transportation Museum and the Potter Park Zoo that houses a lot of endangered and threatened animal species.

While museums and downtown areas are fun, that’s not the only reason Lansing is a great city to move to post-pandemic. Forty-one percent of jobs offered in the city is work from home-friendly, allowing people to keep their distance from the 118,427 person population after stay-at-home orders go away.

Logan, Utah

Logan, Utah
Chris Graythen/Getty Images
Chris Graythen/Getty Images

For those looking to get a different kind of city experience, think about packing up and moving to Logan, Utah. The city lies near the western slopes of the Bear River Mountains, lying directly in the Cache Valley. Pretty much, there is beautiful hiking. But the 51,542 person population has more to offer for those wanting to move to a less densely populated area.

Pre-virus, the unemployment rate was extremely low, at only two percent, so the chance of finding a job is high. And the average commute to and from work is a little under two hours, the 16th shortest among US metropolitan areas.

Rochester, New York

Rochester, New York
Streeter Lecka/Getty Images
Streeter Lecka/Getty Images

Aside from the natural beauty of Rochester, New York, the city is full of weird and fantastic history. The Strong National Museum of Play is dedicated to a bunch of toys and dolls. And then there is the George Eastman Museum, located on the Kodak founder’s estate, which is dedicated to film and photography exhibits.

And while those are reasons enough to move to Rochester, there are more post-pandemic friendly reasons, too. Around 39.3 percent of jobs allow employees a work from home option, making it so you don’t have to go out into the population of 206,284 people.

Madison, Wisconsin

Madison, Wisconsin
Joe Koshollek/NCAA Photos via Getty Images
Joe Koshollek/NCAA Photos via Getty Images

As long as you don’t mind freezing winters, Madison, Wisconsin, is a great place to think about moving after the pandemic. There is a super downtown area, riddled with restaurants, bars, entertainment, and multiple cultural events. But we understand people are a bit hesitant to go out, and the 258,054 population of Madison isn’t helping.

Thankfully, this city has something most don’t. Forty-two percent of jobs offered in Madison can be done from home. So, even when the pandemic is over, the option to stay out of the office is still there!

Peoria, Illinois

Peoria, Illinois
MIRA OBERMAN/AFP/GettyImages
MIRA OBERMAN/AFP/GettyImages

Peoria, Illinois, is the largest city on the Illinois River and is a major port for agricultural trade, mainly livestock, soybeans, and maize. But we’re guessing that’s not the main reason people would be looking to move to this city. As of the 2010 census, the city has a population of 115,007 people.

And while that might seem like a lot, the housing costs are very much worth the larger population. Peoria is among one of the cities in the nation with the lowest cost of living, only costing an average of $875.22 a month!

Bismarck, North Dakota

Bismarck, North Dakota
KAREN BLEIER/AFP via Getty Images
KAREN BLEIER/AFP via Getty Images

Although Forbes named Bismarck, North Dakota, as the seventh fastest-growing small city in the United States back in 2017, that shouldn’t deter anyone from moving here. Yes, the population might be a bit high at 132,678 people, but something can be said about the cost of living in the city.

Seventy-six point seven percent of households use less than 30 percent of their annual income to pay for housing. And with the very low unemployment rate of two point four perfect, it should be fairly simple to find a job!

Ames, Iowa

Ames, Iowa
EQRoy/Shutterstock
EQRoy/Shutterstock

Ames, Iowa, is best known for being the home of Iowa State University, with its population making up half of the city. So, if you’re looking for a less densely populated city to move to, Ames’ 66,258 people (with half being ISU students) is a pretty safe bet!

Also, the unemployment rate pre-virus was only 2 percent, so there is a good chance of finding a job in the quirky city, especially if you’re one of the 50.7 percent of residents who have a bachelors degrees or higher!

Ithaca, New York

Ithaca, New York
Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images
Robert Nickelsberg/Getty Images

For people looking to move after the pandemic cools off, Ithaca, New York, is a beautiful option. The city is perfect for those who love the outdoors, located on the Cayuga Lake and home to the Cornell Botanic Gardens, which includes the multi-tiered Cascadilla Falls.

Of course, there are other reasons to want to move to upstate New York, especially for those with younger kids. Ithaca has the seventh-highest spending per student in elementary and secondary schools, spending $21,220 per student. And with a population of 30,999, schools aren’t as crowded as other metropolitan areas.

Syracuse, New York

Syracuse, New York
Michael Reaves/Getty Images for IRONMAN
Michael Reaves/Getty Images for IRONMAN

When people think of New York, Manhattan typically comes to mind. But that’s not the New York town you’re going to want to move to at the end of the pandemic. Nope, the town you’re going to want to look into is actually upstate in Syracuse.

Not only is it a beautiful area with a lot of parks, trails, seasons, but it also one of the lucky cities that has a high percentage of jobs that can be done at home. So, you won’t have to worry about going out into a population of 145,252 in the city and 662,577 people in the metropolitan area.

Wausau, Wisconsin

Wausau, Wisconsin
John Ewing/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images
John Ewing/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Located on either side of the Wisconsin River is the city of Wausau, Wisconsin. This tiny city is very nature-oriented, having multiple museums dedicated to nature paintings and sculptures, such as The Leigh Yawkey Woodson Art Museum. But that’s not the best part of this city for post-pandemic movers.

Wausau is tinier than most cities, with a population of only 39,114, according to the 2010 census. It is also relatively cheap to live there, with 77.5 percent of people using less than 30 percent of their annual income on housing.

Huntsville, Alabama

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Carol M. Highsmith/Buyenlarge/Getty Images
Carol M. Highsmith/Buyenlarge/Getty Images

With a population of 180,105 people, Huntsville is the fourth-largest city in the state of Alabama. But don’t let that stop you from moving there! In 2010, the city was named as one of “America’s Dozen Distinctive Destinations.” And with the United States Army Aviation and Missile Command and NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center located there, it’s not hard to see why.

But we take it you won’t be going on any touristy trips through the city for some time. Thankfully, 41.5 percent of jobs in Huntsville allow employees to work from home. So, you won’t have to walk among the large population if you don’t want to.

Cheyenne, Wyoming

Cheyenne, Wyoming
Autumn Parry/For The Washington Post via Getty Images
Autumn Parry/For The Washington Post via Getty Images

For people who are looking to move a less densely populated city, look no further than Cheyenne, Wyoming. But aside from the population, which we’ll explain more in a bit, the city has a lot to offer. Cheyenne is home to many historical museums, including the Cheyenne Frontier Days Old West Museum, which has artifacts from the 19th century.

But that’s not the drawing force of this city. For people who are looking to get away from crowded cities, Cheyenne is a great option. The city has 37.1 people per square mile, the 18th-lowest population density in the country.

Cedar Rapids, Iowa

Cedar Rapids, Iowa
Jonathannsegal/Shutterstock
Jonathannsegal/Shutterstock

Cedar Rapids, Iowa, aka “The City of Five Seasons,” is located on the banks of the Cedar River and has a lot to offer anyone thinking about moving to the ever-growing city. The city is a cultural hub, with many museums and events for people to enjoy, like the Theatre Cedar Rapids.

Although the theatre sounds fun, we’re guessing that’s not the reason most people would want to move here after the pandemic. You’re probably more curious about things like the low cost of living. Well, in Cedar Rapids, 75.9 percent of people spend less than 30 percent of their annual income on housing.

Fargo, North Dakota

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Scott Olson/Getty Images
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Fargo, North Dakota, is probably best known for the television show and movie of the same name, but there is more to this city than spooky mysteries. This city is a winter-lovers dream, with an average annual snowfall of 50.1 inches.

But the snow isn’t what makes this city look good for someone looking to move after the pandemic. Fargo is actually one of the cities with the lowest pre-virus unemployment rates, at two percent. So, if you’re thinking about braving the cold winters, at least you’ll have a job.