Americans No Longer Want To Live In These States And They’re Moving On To Greener Pastures

With 50 states in the nation, it’s hard to choose where to settle down. One thing is for certain, though, there are some states Americans no longer want to live in for various reasons. Whether it’s the high cost of living in sunny California or the unemployment rate in Mississippi, people are flocking out of their native states to find greener pastures elsewhere in the United States.

Some survey data, polls, and resident testimony made it clear which states are less favorable among Americans. Keep scrolling to see which states people no longer want to live in; some might surprise you.

Maine Residents Want To Retire Somewhere Warmer

Maine Residents Want To Retire Somewhere Warmer
Wild Horizons/Universal Images Group via Getty Images
Wild Horizons/Universal Images Group via Getty Images

Maine is a beautiful coastal state with lovely ports, mountains, and wilderness as far as the eye can see. But people aren’t exactly looking to make the state their home. Most residents, especially the elderly that account for 59 percent of the population, move out of Maine’s borders in search of finding somewhere else a bit warmer to call home.

Long-time Maine resident Elsa K. wrote on Quora, “It gets cold during the winter. And windy and snowy. I’m from northern Iceland, and the winters in Maine aren’t as long or dark as in Iceland, they are colder and snowier.”

Iowa Is “Just A Boring State To Live In”

Iowa Is "Just A Boring State To Live In."
Msrivertime/Pinterest
Msrivertime/Pinterest

The sunsets over Iowa’s cornfields are something to behold, and its job market and cities are continuing to grow, but none of that is keeping residents within the state’s borders. People 44 and younger are leaving Iowa in search of better job opportunities and a lifestyle change, while older people are leaving for retirement.

According to United Van Lines, “68.22 percent are moving out of the state to find employment, while 12.4 percent are leaving for retirement.” Then there’s one Reddit user that complained about “the states weather extremes, poorly funded public schools, and crumbling infrastructure, and that Iowa’s is a boring state to live in.”

Rhode Island Has A High Cost Of Living

Rhode Island Has A High Cost Of Living
Ron Pownall/Getty Images
Ron Pownall/Getty Images

As the smallest state in the United States by area, Rhode Island is seeing a large outflow of people. While there are many reasons people are leaving the Ocean State, a majority leave for a few simple reasons, namely the cost of living and jobs. The cost of living in Rhode Island is extremely high, so if a job opportunity comes up, people tend to take it.

Also, retirees flock from the state in search of warmer and cheaper pastures. A 2018 Nation Movers Study by United Van Lines said, “the primary reason for them leaving was for jobs. Others left for family, lifestyle, or retirement reasons.”

Minnesota Has Horrible Weather

Minnesota Has Horrible Weather
STEPHEN MATUREN/AFP via Getty Images
STEPHEN MATUREN/AFP via Getty Images

Minnesota is one of those states where you have to love the cold and snow to live there happily since it is one of the chilliest states in the country. The Land of 10,000 Lakes had a nice three-year stretch of people flocking to its frozen landscape, but that came to a halt in 2019. And it’s not just because of the weather.

According to 98.1 Minnesota’s New Country, “62.43 percent of people moved out of the state for different jobs. And17.99 percent of people left because of retirement. Everyone knows someone who snowbirds down to a warmer state for the winter!”

Oklahoma Has Fewer And Fewer Jobs

Oklahoma Has Fewer And Fewer Jobs
Brett Deering/Getty Images
Brett Deering/Getty Images

Unfortunately for Oklahoma, Americans are no longer interested in flocking to the state to see its wide-open prairies and forests. The past few years have debunked a ten-year trend of people coming into the state. Now, more people seem to be leaving Oklahoma after college.

Vice president at the Oklahoma City Branch of the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City, Chad Wilkerson, says, “that a driving force in recent out-migration from the state has been relatively fewer job opportunities than in some other parts of the country following the oil price drop of 2014-2015.”

Georgia Is Too Expensive

Georgia Is Too Expensive
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

While it might come to a surprise to see Georgia on this list, there is a reason. People tend to visit Georgia, typically Atlanta, but they don’t move there. On the contrary, it seems people are trying to leave the state. What it comes down to are expenses.

Governing magazine acknowledged that rent costs were up 28% in the city since 2000, compared to the nine percent raise in other states around the country. In 2018, A HotPads report found that the renting prices were rising three times faster than that of other cities. It’s no wonder people want to find other places to settle down!

North Dakota Residents Don’t Enjoy The Lifestyle

North Dakota Residents Don't Enjoy The Lifestyle
Andrew Burton/Getty Images
Andrew Burton/Getty Images

It probably doesn’t come as much a surprise that North Dakota is one of the least populated states in the country. The sparse population isn’t even due to a lack of employment opportunities. On the contrary, it’s said that if a person moves there, they will most certainly find a job.

It’s more so the lifestyle that has people adverse to moving to The Peace Garden State. United Van Lines says, “The most common reason to leave North Dakota – cited by nearly 61 percent of those who move out – is the lifestyle.” Someone on Quora wrote, “every state has something interesting about it. What’s interesting about North Dakota?”

Mississippi Has One Of The Highest Unemployment Rates

Mississippi Has One Of The Highest Unemployment Rates
Spencer Platt/Getty Images
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

There is a lot to be admired about Mississippi — the southern culture and the people for instance. But the Magnolia State suffers from one of the highest unemployment rates in the country. Tack on the humid weather, bugs, and overall stickiness, and people are not exactly jumping at the opportunity to move to Mississippi.

During a healthcare and economic summit in 2018, a Tradition report stated that “When we analyze population estimates by age, we see Mississippi is losing people at the age when they would be entering their prime earning years, while other states are gaining them.” According to Census data, Mississippi is losing millennials at a rapid rate.

Arkansas Struggles With Poverty

Arkansas Struggles With Poverty
Paul Harris/Getty Images
Paul Harris/Getty Images

Ironically, Arkansas is known as “The Land of Opportunity,” but struggles with poverty and unemployment. While the state boasts beautiful parks, wilderness areas, and a great university, nearly 71 percent of the state’s residents flee in search of work.

The Washington Post reported, “[in 2018] the state became the first to require Medicaid recipients to hold jobs, and thousands lost their health insurance in the months that followed. Critics of the Medicaid move say Arkansas doesn’t have enough work to go around.”

West Virginia Has A Dwindling Economy

A farm and an old country church share a dirt road
Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images
Michael S. Williamson/The Washington Post via Getty Images

West Virginia attracts visitors with its soaring mountains and flowing rivers, but the dwindling economy has young people flocking to other states. With the state’s opioid crisis, the unemployment rate is one of the highest in the country. The ever-decreasing population can’t support businesses that would otherwise expand to West Virginia and make job opportunities.

Director of the Bureau of Business and Economic Research at WVU, John Deskins, says, “population growth is part of making the state attractive to potential businesses. A business has to be confident it’s going to find workers it needs before it locates in an area.” This is a vicious cycle.

Pennsylvania Retirees Would Prefer Less Snow

Pennsylvania Retirees Would Prefer Less Snow
Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images
Jessica Kourkounis/Getty Images

As young people move into Pennsylvania, older people are flocking to warmer states. In 2019, the state saw 51.2 percent of its residents leave. And while Pennsylvania has a lot to be admired, such as the affordable living and the sports teams, a vast majority of retirees would rather move somewhere with less snow and wind chill.

Pew Charitable Trusts released a study saying, “What is clear is that there is not one overarching reason for relocating. Most of those who left Philadelphia characterized themselves as not fleeing, but, rather, as seeking new opportunities elsewhere.”

Missouri Doesn’t Have Enough Work

GettyImages-150289969
Raymond Boyd/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images
Raymond Boyd/Michael Ochs Archives/Getty Images

While Missouri is called the “Gateway to the West” due to the huge archway that dominates the skyline, residents seem to move through other gateways and on to other states. The reasons for people leaving the state are simple. With factories closing, there aren’t enough jobs.

According to moneywise, “Jobs are the reason behind 63 percent of the moves.” And the Bureau of Labor Statistics states that “factories have been closing around Kansas City, causing that metro area to lose 1.9 percent of its manufacturing jobs over the past year.”

Utah Doesn’t Have Job Opportunities

Utah Doesn't Have Job Opportunities
Doug Pensinger/Getty Images
Doug Pensinger/Getty Images

Utah is actually a popular retirement location, with its national parks and snowcapped mountains. That being said, the state has a difficult time keeping its younger residents. Both job opportunities have been cited as reasons for 65 percent of outbound moves, while another reason is the rising house prices.

According to a 2019 quarterly report conducted by the National Association of Realtors, “the median price for an existing single-family home in Salt Lake City has climbed eight percent over the last year to a stiff $358,000.”

Michigan Jobs Don’t Have Good Pay

Michigan Jobs Don't Have Good Pay
Joshua Lott/Getty Images
Joshua Lott/Getty Images

While Michigan has 3,300 miles of coastline and beautiful parks, residents aren’t fooled. Michigan has harsh weather conditions, making elderly people search out other states for their retirements. And as far as young people are concerned, they’re flocking to other states in search of better-paying jobs and opportunities.

According to Bridge Magazine, “While the state offers job opportunities in computers, math, and management, it’s got even more lover-paying work – such as in food preparation, paying under $20,000 per year.” The lack of meaningful work leads highly-educated young people to develop “brain drain,” says the Joint Economic Committee, which causes them to search for better opportunities elsewhere.

Kentucky’s Minimum Wage Is $7.25

Kentucky's Minimum Wage Is $7.25
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images
Raymond Boyd/Getty Images

Kentucky’s sweeping bluegrass landscape is not enough to keep residents from moving out of the state. With one of the highest unemployment rates in the country, residents are leaving in search of jobs that pay more than the minimum wage of $7.25. Yes, that’s what the minimum wage has been for the past ten years in the state!

According to a United Van Lines report, “More than half the people who move out of Kentucky are leaving to take a better job somewhere else.” Thankfully, Kentucky officials have stated that more job opportunities will open up in the coming years.

Hawaii Is Too Expensive

Hawaii Is Too Expensive
BRIAN BIELMANN/AFP via Getty Images
BRIAN BIELMANN/AFP via Getty Images

Hawaii is arguably one of the nation’s most beautiful states. With its white-sand beaches, jungle-like landscape, and beautiful mountains, it’s obvious why tourists love visiting. But those tourists never want to stay for more than a few weeks, and wouldn’t consider living there for an extended period. This is mainly due to the ridiculously high price that is tacked onto island living.

Ex-Hawaii resident Michael Hernandez, says, “The only way that I would return to Hawaii is if I hit the lottery [in Florida] and could make enough to move my family and retire. However, that seems almost impossible with just how much more everything costs on the island.”

Virginia Is Being Left For Retirement

Virginia Is Being Left For Retirement
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images
BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP via Getty Images

Even with its beautiful beaches, mountains, and low taxes, people are moving out of Virginia. Ironically, the state is considered to be one of the best for retirees because of the previously mentioned aspects. And yet, seniors are the majority age bracket that is leaving Virginia.

But retirement isn’t the only reason people are moving out; job opportunities are another factor. According to the Nation Movers Study by United Van Lines, 23.54 percent of people are moving for retirement, while 48.25 percent are moving for new employment opportunities.

Wisconsin Has Harsh Winters

Wisconsin Has A Harsh Winter
Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images
Jonathan Daniel/Getty Images

Even though Wisconsin’s low cost of living and steady employment growth is attractive to people, it’s not stopping residents from packing up their Green Bay Packers cheesehead hats and moving on out. It’s not surprising that people are moving away since the state has one of the harshest winters in the country.

According to the National Weather Service, “In the entire state’s recorded weather history, every winter but five, [when it] hit temperatures of at least 30 below zero.” In 2018, it was reported that more than half of those who moved out were ages 55 and older, probably wanting to retire somewhere warmer!

Nebraska Has Too Many “No Experience Necessary” Jobs

Nebraska Has One Too Many
Scott Olson/Getty Images
Scott Olson/Getty Images

While Nebraska is home to Warren Buffet, the state isn’t exactly one that has people flocking to it for its lovely weather and surrounding natural attractions. It’s quite the opposite, actually. People are leaving the state in search of better job opportunities and weather that doesn’t change every five minutes, as residents joke.

A United Van Lines report stated, “A hefty 70 percent of those who move out of Nebraska are leaving in search of work.” Something called “brain drain” is prevalent among residents due to the lack of high-paying jobs and the abundance of minimum-wage, no-experience necessary positions.

Maryland Is An Expensive State To Settle Down

Maryland Is An Expensive State To Settle Down
Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images
Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images

Maryland is known for its rich history, good quality of life, and numerous outdoor activities, but those factors aren’t keeping residents from leaving the state. People are venturing to other parts of the nation because of the high cost of living in Maryland, job opportunities, and retirement.

According to a United Van Lines report in 2018, 49.76 percent of people are leaving because of employment opportunities elsewhere, while 21.74 percent of residents are searching for a place to retire. The population of Baltimore is said to be at a 100-year low!

Ohio’s Young People Are Flocking To More Vibrant Cities

Ohio's Young People Are Flocking To More Vibrant Cities
Rick Gershon/Getty Images
Rick Gershon/Getty Images

For many people living in coastal states, Ohio offers a nice change of pace with a lower cost of living and welcoming residents. And while plenty of people are moving to Ohio, more are trying to leave the state. A majority of the moves are job-based, due to Ohio’s low employment rate and slow industry growth.

According to United Van Lines, “the biggest reason [people are leaving] by far is jobs, at 60.75 percent.” Michael Stoll, chair of the Department of Public Policy at UCLA, says, “[We’re seeing] young professionals migrating to more vibrant, metropolitan economies like Washington D.C. and Seattle.”

New Jersey’s Property Tax Is Very High

New Jersey's Property Tax Is Very High
Kena Betancur/Getty Images
Kena Betancur/Getty Images

The Garden State has a coastline of beaches, some of the best pizza in the nation, family suburbs, and tasty local produce. But none of that is stopping people from leaving New Jersey. Although residents from the tiny state are proud to be New Jerseyans, they are moving in droves because of the property taxes and weather.

According to United Van Lines, “people are moving out [of New Jersey] faster than from any other state. More than a third flee the state because of job opportunities elsewhere, and an equal share leaves to find greener pastures for retirement.”

Montana Residents Move To Be Closer To Family

Montana Residents Move To Be Closer To Family
Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images
Wolfgang Kaehler/LightRocket via Getty Images

With its beautiful open landscape, mountains, and fresh air, it’s hard to believe people willingly leave Montana. And while A-list celebrities are beginning to buy vacation homes in the state, locals are packing up their bags and leaving. Unlike other states on this list, the reason for leaving isn’t because of jobs or weather, but to be closer to family.

According to the radio station 107.5, “55 percent of all moves are to leave the state. The biggest reason for people leaving Montana is family.” With people living on secluded plots of land, it makes sense that they might want to move closer to family, even out of state.

California Isn’t All Golden

California Isn't All Golden
Ken Levine/Getty Images
Ken Levine/Getty Images

California is the land of beautiful people and one of the best climates in the nation. With palm tree-lined roads and beaches stretching up and down the coast, it’s hard for people to not enjoy the Golden State.

That being said, more people are leaving the state than ever before because of the cost of living and the annoyance that is traffic congestion on all California freeways. According to the U.S. Census Bureau’s annual American Community Survey, “In 2018, approximately 691,000 people moved from California to another U.S. state.”

Connecticut Isn’t A Good State For Retirement

Connecticut Isn't A State To Retire
John Moore/Getty Images
John Moore/Getty Images

Connecticut’s gorgeous beaches, lovely seasons, and charming towns attract many visitors each year, but the residents are hustling to leave. As taxes and the price of living rise and the pothole-littered streets get worse, people close to retirement can’t help but move on out of the state.

Considering the harsh winters and expensive lifestyle Connecticut has to offer, it’s no surprise that older people are looking for a warmer and cheaper living arrangement. According to United Van Lines, “People nearing retirement (ages 55 to 64) are most likely to move out of Connecticut. More than half of those who depart have incomes of $150,000 and up.”

Massachusetts Is An Expensive State

Massachusetts Is An Expensive State
Ezra Shaw/Getty Images
Ezra Shaw/Getty Images

The coastal state of Massachusetts is the perfect place to sit back and watch sailboats, enjoy a fresh lobster roll, and it also has a great school system. Unfortunately, the state is also known to be extremely expensive to live in, especially near the center hub of Boston.

According to the radio station 90.9 wbur, “The high cost of housing in the Boston area, both to buy and to rent, is another factor, forcing quality-of-life trade-offs that many prospective residents my not be willing to make.” Tack on the harsh east coast winters and the horrible traffic congestion in the state, and it’s no surprise people are leaving.

New York City Is Not The Place To Start A Family

New York City Is Not The Place To Start A Family
MARTIN BUREAU/AFP via Getty Images
MARTIN BUREAU/AFP via Getty Images

While New York probably offers one of the most unique styles of living in the country, it comes at a high price. All of the food, culture, and busy lifestyle aren’t worth the lack of job security in some of the rural towns, or the four-figure studio apartment rent in the city.

And while New York is a great place for young people, others who are trying to start a family flock to more affordable living situations. According to Bloomberg, “close to 300 people move out of New York every day.” Now, that stat should tell you something!

Louisiana Has A Low Employment Rate

Louisiana Has A Low Employment Rate
Ethan Miller/Getty Images
Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Louisiana is an appealing state for many reasons; its coastal location, delicious food, and unique culture are just a few. Even though those attractions are good for visitors, residents are trying their hardest to leave the low employment rate the state has to offer its locals.

According to the recent 2019 numbers given by the Bureau of Labor Statistics, “After hitting a high in 2014, the number of people employed in Louisiana has decreased significantly. In fact, 4,801 fewer people are employed.”

Kansas Doesn’t Have Favorable Weather

Kansas Doesn't Have Favorable Weather
Jason Weingart / Barcroft Media via Getty Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images
Jason Weingart / Barcroft Media via Getty Images / Barcroft Media via Getty Images

While The Wizard of Oz‘s Dorothy once famously said, “there’s no place like home,” many people are following the yellow brick road directly out of Kansas. This isn’t due to high unemployment rates or affordability, both of which are very attractive when it comes to the Sunflower State.

Rather, people are leaving for other job opportunities away from the “windy with a chance of a tornado or two” weather. According to United Van Lines, 63.8 percent of people cited work as their reason for leaving Kansas.

Illinois Residents Are Leaving For The Sun Belt

Illinois Residents Are Leaving For The Sun Belt
Scott Olson/Getty Images
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Illinois has great farm produce, deep-dish pizza, awesome colleges and sports teams, and one of the coolest cities in America, Chicago. Even so, residents of the state are flocking to other parts of the nation. There are a few reasons why people are leaving, one being the state’s high property taxes.

According to Governing magazine, “A 2016 poll by Southern Illinois University found that nearly half of Illinois residents wanted to move to another state, citing taxes, weather, ineffective and corrupt local government and a lack of middle-class jobs.”